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16 April 2007 @ 11:28 pm
 
Tonight's dinner was rather good. So, for anyone who wants the recipe, here you go.

From The Good Carb Diet Plan, slightly amended:

Griddled Chicken With Pearl Barley.

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 tbsp olive oil
1 1/4 cup pearl barley, cooked according to package instructions
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 red chili, finely chopped
4 tablespoons chopped cilantro
grated zest and juice of 2 limes
1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
salt and pepper

1. Brush each chicken breast with a little oil. Heat a grill pan until hot and cook the chicken for 4-5 minutes on each side until golden and cooked through.

2. Stir the remaining oil into the barley and add the onion, chili, cilantro, lime zest and juice and red bell pepper. Season to taste with salt and pepper and stir to combine.

3. Serve the barely topped with the chicken, garnished with parsley and lime wedges.




My notes:

I did most of the prep work early. I mixed the red bell pepper, red onion, cilantro and lime zest (couldn't find red chili pepper, so I opened a small can of diced green chilies and added two or three tablespoons) and let it hang out until shortly before I was ready to heat the grill pan - about an hour, I'd say. I kept the lime juice aside in a small bowl.

I also cooked the barley early 'cause it takes some time (45 minutes). Here's the thing: the recipe calls for 1 1/4 cup barley. The package directions are for a full cup. "Eh," thought I, "I'll just double it .Surely I can use any excess cooked barley for something! It's only three quarters of a cup left over. No worries." Only barley is HUGE. I'm not even sure I used a full 1 1/4 cup in my final recipe, and I thought I was being generous. Cooked pearl barley takes up space in a decided manner.

I kept the barley warm on a burner over the oven vent (I was heating the oven for roasted asparagus with olive oil and sea salt), and heated my square Calphalon grill pan (test run!). Trimmed the breasts of excess fat, the pounded them to uniform thickness with the flat of a mallet. Seasoned with S&P (you could marinate the chicken if you want, but the barley mixture is so flavorful, I wouldn't even bother), then spread a thin coat of olive oil on each side. I'm happy to say my grill pan worked quite well. Once the breasts were done, I set them aside to rest and added the warmed barley to the veggie/herb mix. Eyeballed in a bit of olive oil and most of the lime juice, tossed it all together and lo! dinner was served.


And it was good.







and just in case you've never roasted asparagus:

heat oven to 400
on foil lined pan, toss fresh asparagus with extra virgin olive oil and kosher or sea salt
cook 6-8 minutes (shaking once), until tender-crisp
~always err on the side of 'too crisp.' Better that than mushy.

If you really want to get schnazzy, you can grate some fresh parmesan onto the stalks and let it get all golden and yummy.
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Kerry: Scrubs So Funnyscreamingdolai on April 17th, 2007 01:35 pm (UTC)
I read that as Griddled Chicken with Pearl BAILEY.
Well HELLO DOLLY!
Kel: Kitten!Tenladyjoust on April 19th, 2007 03:19 am (UTC)
... aaaaaand that made me snort. hee!
Amanada (rhymes with Canada)mandasarah on April 18th, 2007 03:46 am (UTC)
I've never had barley, do I don't know if I would like that part (but I know I don't like bell peppers), but the asparagus bit had me drooling. My love of asparagus is almost as great as my love of all things potato.
Kel: Nine smilingladyjoust on April 19th, 2007 03:22 am (UTC)
That was First Time Barley for me. Not much taste on its own. If you have texture issues (as I do) it may be a concern, but I found it to be sort of a chewy, slightly softer brown-rice type texture.

Oh, I love asparagus, too! I was just thinking I may need to make soup.

Side story: my husband swore he hated asparagus. Then Icooked it, and he tried it and found that lo! mayhap it hadn't been prepared all that well when he was growing up. It's all about keeping it crisp. Let it get mushy and it's all over.